I thought everyone agreed chipmusic is a way not a genre. Wait what?

There are vaporwaves who grabs a little from chipmusic. And some would be called post-chip, with this definition proposed at the first post. Hell, some are chipmusic, at my book. (i don't have a book)

But this is nonsense. Do whatever, chip is not a genre, imo, but wtv anyway.

SOUNDS PRETTY POST-CHIP TO ME ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

honestly my whole take on this is i dont care how you made your music if it involves hardware/ laptops/ vsts/ cartridges / assemblers / sequencers / trackers , as long as you stay active in this community and dont be a hater and dont tell everyone they are doing it wrong or they should be doing something a specific way then your a chip artist , i used to think i needed to be a chip purist and only use chip hardware but now i just want to have fun , i just enjoy using my commodore or gameboy advance or DMG or NES or SEGA hardware over virtual synthesis but also use drum machines and my laptop and audio hardware.. but yeah anyways i agree with u up here sonic beat that chiptune is a way of life and isnt a genre like i thought it was 7-8 years ago when i started out.. heart glooms

Last edited by GLOOMS (February 15, 2017 7:49 pm)

Yeah.... like..

Yeah...

Subway Sonicbeat wrote:

I thought everyone agreed chipmusic is a way not a genre. Wait what?

There are vaporwaves who grabs a little from chipmusic. And some would be called post-chip, with this definition proposed at the first post. Hell, some are chipmusic, at my book. (i don't have a book)

But this is nonsense. Do whatever, chip is not a genre, imo, but wtv anyway.

You'll find that nobody really seems to agree on what chip music really is. But that's what makes things so interesting on these kind of discussion threads.

Afterall, what would the world be without a little debate and discussion on subjective matters? wink

4mat wrote:

Chip sample tracker modules weren't called chipmusic because they used 'chips' of a bigger sound, it was because the small-form waveforms resembled the sounds from the old SID/AY etc. chips, rather than full samples.

So would it be accurate to say that chipmusic has been 'retro' since the beginning? As a music culture?

Last edited by breakphase (February 18, 2017 4:01 am)

marcb0t wrote:

You'll find that nobody really seems to agree on what chip music really is. But that's what makes things so interesting on these kind of discussion threads.

Afterall, what would the world be without a little debate and discussion on subjective matters? wink

Don't get me wrong! It's just a debate that gets nowhere everytime and it is all semantics. That's why I say it is nonsense. Not beacuse it doesn't matter, is just that it doesn't move anyone forward, actually. It would help much more if it was a discussion based on other stuff than to give it a life as a genre or wtv.
Dunno if i'm making myself clear.

The main point is DO WHATEVER, NEVERMIND THE BOLLOCKS.

breakphase wrote:
4mat wrote:

Chip sample tracker modules weren't called chipmusic because they used 'chips' of a bigger sound, it was because the small-form waveforms resembled the sounds from the old SID/AY etc. chips, rather than full samples.

So would it be accurate to say that chipmusic has been 'retro' since the beginning? As a music culture?

Personally I'd say no because the c64 was still a commercially active machine when chipmusic drivers were happening on the Amiga.  Even some early games had chipmusic-like tracks instead of the common sample-based ones.  It was more of a 'we can do this as well' thing than nostalgia I think, plus economically from a size POV having a chip song in a cracktro or game makes sense.

4mat wrote:

Personally I'd say no because the c64 was still a commercially active machine when chipmusic drivers were happening on the Amiga.  Even some early games had chipmusic-like tracks instead of the common sample-based ones.  It was more of a 'we can do this as well' thing than nostalgia I think, plus economically from a size POV having a chip song in a cracktro or game makes sense.

Or the game didn't leave you with more than 4k.

Yes exactly, it wasn't unheard of to end up with only 20-30k free for audio on an amiga game.  Had to work in that space myself.

4mat wrote:

Yes exactly, it wasn't unheard of to end up with only 20-30k free for audio on an amiga game.  Had to work in that space myself.

Oh that's an interesting point. So the reliance on simple waveforms and older music sounds was driven by its own technological limitations. The processor was ready for sampled audio, but not the storage media. And of course there was no mp3.

breakphase wrote:
4mat wrote:

Yes exactly, it wasn't unheard of to end up with only 20-30k free for audio on an amiga game.  Had to work in that space myself.

Oh that's an interesting point. So the reliance on simple waveforms and older music sounds was driven by its own technological limitations. The processor was ready for sampled audio, but not the storage media. And of course there was no mp3.

Indeed, at the time this was all 'cutting-edge' and, as musicians, priced a lot lower than comparable pro hardware.  If when the Amiga had come out there had been a machine with, say, 32 digi channels for the same price we'd probably have bought that instead.  I don't think anyone was thinking about forced limitations because this was 'teh future'.