1

(4 replies, posted in Trading Post)

Just a clarification: That's Nanoloop One, not 1.0. The Nanoloop One hardware run the Nanoloop 1.7 software.

You could also try using the original native application for Windows or OSX. It's not linked any more, but the files are still up on the server. It might be more stable than the web version.

http://www.nanoloop.com/midi/nanoloop_171_win.zip
http://www.nanoloop.com/midi/nanoloop_171_osx.zip

Another thing to check for is if the pins of the link cable are pushed into the connector, which in my experience sometimes happens because of the pressure from the MIDI adapter.

Yes, sirette! Feel free to apply.

You're in luck. As the website launches, a limited edition of previous titles will be offered, including the first Heebie GBs and Xmas 16.

cyberic wrote:

Could you please indicate a more precise date for the deadline? thx

The deadline is a bit flexible, but the important thing is that the release needs to be finished well before Halloween, including programming, manufacturing the carts, and allowing for shipping time and any unforeseen events. It's not too late to apply at this point.

A prosound mod is the single most effective thing you can do to reduce noise. If you're fine with not using this DMG directly with headphones (only for recording or through a mixer) and don't want to modify the case, you could prosound it through the existing jack.

7

(8 replies, posted in General Discussion)

The torrent tracker offers some clue:

http://tracker.modarchive.org/

Some back of the envelope calculations: The 2007 snapshot is claimed to contain 120000 (hundred and twenty thousand!) modules and is about 30 GB big. 120000/30=4000 gives about 4000 modules per gigabyte of data. The addition packs for each year is about 1 GB and accounts for ~10 years, so that's another 40000 modules. Those are very rough numbers but that should give you an idea.

Although that's across all module formats, like xm, s3m, it etc, not just mod. Not sure if that's important for your statistics.

8

(8 replies, posted in General Discussion)

Click music in the top bar and filter by file type.

Edit: Or do you mean on tbe whole internet?

We are looking for songs that are newly composed for this compilation. We are asking for a portfolio or similar to be able judge your composition style. The reason being, since this is paid work, we prefer to discuss the details before the artists starts working on a song, to avoid a situation where the artist works for many hours on something that we ultimately can't accept. As Apeshit mentioned in the original post, you're still welcome to submit a song for the compilation without this step, but with the risk that it's not accepted for the compilation.

10

(8 replies, posted in General Discussion)

It has a link port on the front so anything that works on a regular GBA should probably work on the Player as well.

This is a forum for people making music using old computers and video game consoles. You probably won't find any advice regarding supercomputer chips here. Maybe try the EEVBlog forum.

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/

The talking C is mostly me. The password is shared between all the admins, but in fact I believe only me and Tim have access to it now since we changed it after it got hacked. Nothing bad was tweeted or anything like that, but the account was suddenly used for following thousands of people. So that's some insight from the other side into how "buying Twitter followers" works.

Yeah, the tweet was mostly about the pun: dog, woof. I considered saying just woofer instead of subwoofer, to make the pun even clearer, but didn't. I often wonder if the puns (when the lines are puns) are too dry.

New version released.

New in BGB 1.5.3 (2017-03-04) - Accuracy improvements, including: pokemon (all versions) now has correct TID for speedruns. Fixed a large number of bugs and problems, including: "uncoverable direct3d error" on some Optimus laptops. Added improved support for automation/commandline use. Significant performance/efficiency improvement with most roms. Added support for loading RTC .sav files where a timestamp in the future does not (incorrectly) advance time.

pselodux wrote:

This is an interesting idea.. if you use something super reflective (ie. moreso than the film from a stock gameboy) would it mean you could see your reflection in it?!

You already can, even if faintly. If you hold your finger to a stock DMG screen and look closely, you'll see two reflections, just like on a regular mirror btw. One from the front of the glass, and a fainter one that is slightly offset, from the reflective layer. For best effect use a spotlight pointing to the area you;re looking at.

15

(3 replies, posted in Nintendo Handhelds)

You've done your research. Well done. Indeed, left and B share the same physical input on the CPU. If you insert or remove the ribbon cable while the DMG is on, and misalign the cable ever so slightly so this connection is short circuited to the next one, which happens to be a -19 V supply for the LCD, the left/B input on the CPU is permanently damaged. Moral of the story, always turn off the DMG before inserting/removing that connector.

Are you absolutely sure the B button still works? There's really no way the left button could be broken without the b button unless there was some kind of problem, like a broken trace, around the area before the the B and left traces meet up on the LCD board. But then it wouldn't make sense that the button would start working, unless you accidentally rejiggered something in the process. If indeed it's an intermittent problem with the LCD board button connections, the good news is that you should be able to fix it with a little bit of soldering.

If it turns out to be a CPU problem, don't throw it away. You could give this 'boy some new life as a LSDj slave mode player, or MIDI synth.

As for probing, these are the relevant signals on the ribbon cable:

Pin 04 Left & B buttons
Pin 05 Button Diodes 1 & 2 (directionals)
Pin 06 Down & Start buttons
Pin 07 Up & Select buttons
Pin 08 Right & A Buttons
Pin 09 Button Diodes 3 & 4 (buttons)

The way it works is you have to put the negative (black) multimeter probe on the "diode" connection and the positive (red) probe on the other corresponding connection. As you press a button those two connections will short. Since there is a diode in series, you need to use the diode mode rather than the resistance mode, and beeping may not work so you might have to look at the multimeter screen for a readout instead.

Schematic for reference:

Site5, but currently planning to move the site because of this discussion.