Serious question, why would one want to sequence on an NES instead of sequencing in Famitracker and exporting tracks in iNES format? The controls on console-based trackers have always felt very awkward and unintuitive to me (but of course, that's coming from someone who learned to track on a computer). Is it that it gives options for live performance?

I kinda agree with consoles. Trackers like LSDJ make more sense on portable devices, and trackers like the baldwin suite work on hardware because they are gear towards live playback and tweaking. If you want to compose NSFs or music for games, stick with famitracker.

for me its the challenge like i started in FL7, moved down to renoise, moved down to milkytracker, moved down to famitracker and then i started teaching myself console trackers like NTRQ.. and for some people its more intuitive at points kinda like when you are playing an old RPGs and and you have all the menus memorized.. the other point someone who is not me would make is that it makes it a bit more authentic which i dont really care about.. i will say having a native tracker for the SNES would probably pop my cherry when it comes to eventually writing FM synthesis ..

The SNES cannot do FM synthesis. Its a sample based soundchip.

Mario Paint?

defiantsystems wrote:

Mario Paint?

Winner winner! Completely forgot about that one. big_smile
I would like to work on a music program for the SNES in the future, though I cannot see myself talking it much farther than a proof of concept ROM.

mario paint is like labsound or pocket music its only like halfway there..

Dezaemon had a primitive sequencer for Super Famicom (+Famicom). It's what us cool kids were using in the late 90's.

Ahhhh, this is a good thread to read! 

I'd love to excitedly wave my arms around and "tell all" about what's been coming together in the last few weeks.  But I'm still waiting to get hold of a SNES Flashcart to continue design work in the "real" space.  How's the code comin' along Ferris?  ;-)

People always forget about Dezaemon lol ! wink

ctrix: oh, it's coming along pretty nicely.. lots of details to work out but I suspect to be able to pass you a test binary by the weekend wink

Nice one mate!  I'll work on some more functionality for that 32/64/128 short-sample wave drawer and get a breakdown of the interface to you soon.  Going be funny to hear people rage when they hear / see the effects of BRR on their waveforms!

(In other words - hang in there.... we may have something coming if we don't run into too many hurdles.  Our little idea / workflow might not be for everyone, but it'll be something new and hopefully fun at minimum.  It'll be a fair few months off.  But 2014... maybe mid year?)

cTrix wrote:

we may have something coming

correction: something IS coming. wink

Brother Android wrote:

The controls on console-based trackers have always felt very awkward and unintuitive to me

Well there is one answer right there. The opposite of that is true for some people.

defiantsystems wrote:

Mario Paint?

best to write Mario Paint music on the PC with Mario Pants it gives you way more control wink

SketchMan3 wrote:
Brother Android wrote:

The controls on console-based trackers have always felt very awkward and unintuitive to me

Well there is one answer right there. The opposite of that is true for some people.

I can tell you now that the instrument creation part for SNES would probably not work in-console.  Really, if you want to hand the full power of the SNES to the composer, you have to let them make their own samples - which means they need to prep on a machine with a soundcard / DAW.  And if you offer a feature set that breaks down some of the additional untapped functionality (noise generator, effects DSP, etc) then it becomes clear that it's a little beyond what is easy to do in-console.  There are some heavy limitations when preparing samples : the ADPCM style compression + filtering crunches things around pretty wildly and it's way better to preview that stuff before it hits the console!  We're workin' on it.  Summer of 2014.  It's hopefully going to be a fun time for the SNES.

cTrix wrote:
SketchMan3 wrote:

Well there is one answer right there. The opposite of that is true for some people.

I can tell you now that the instrument creation part for SNES would probably not work in-console.  Really, if you want to hand the full power of the SNES to the composer, you have to let them make their own samples - which means they need to prep on a machine with a soundcard / DAW.  And if you offer a feature set that breaks down some of the additional untapped functionality (noise generator, effects DSP, etc) then it becomes clear that it's a little beyond what is easy to do in-console.  There are some heavy limitations when preparing samples : the ADPCM style compression + filtering crunches things around pretty wildly and it's way better to preview that stuff before it hits the console!  We're workin' on it.  Summer of 2014.  It's hopefully going to be a fun time for the SNES.

would not mind patching samples at all... super excited to see this happen