catskull wrote:
darenager wrote:

Also don't use lead free solder, use leaded.

This is not based in reality.

Leaded solder is generally easier to solder properly by hand because it melts at a lower temperature and it's eutectic, ie solidifies at a single temperature rather than having a transition range between its liquid and solid phase. You can get decent lead free solder nowadays, but as a general recommendation it still holds true.

I keep both on my bench and the difference to me is negligible.

Which type of unleaded do you use?

Currently I've got a spool of 96.5/3/0.5 tin/silver/copper. 0.38mm diameter. Works out pretty well for me! Though I should probably step back from the ledge, I'm not saying it's 100% always bad advice to say "don't use lead-free solder", but I think in the context, the lead content of the guy's solder is so irrelevant that giving that advice is not going to help in any way.

catskull wrote:
darenager wrote:

Also don't use lead free solder, use leaded.

This is not based in reality.

With all due respect yes it very much is, the solder used in the manufacture of the DMG is leaded, and any electronics engineer would always endeavour to use the same type of solder where possible as mixing unleaded with leaded is not a good idea, for example: http://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/ … ee-solder/

There are also other considerations to take into account, as nitro2k01 has already said leaded is generally much easier, and it provides much better wetting - especially helpful in larger voids such as the holes in in the hhl bivert pcb, where it is essential that the solder flows freely between the bivert pcb contacts and the original leaded solder joint on the DMG pcb below it.

Last edited by darenager (July 12, 2017 2:11 am)