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France

Computer skills, hmm... I learned C language a long time ago, but it was too difficult for me. I am unfamiliar with computers (I'm using it only since I am 19 years old), except using FL Studio but I often do mistakes.

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Victoria, Canada

Made my first punk program, printing profanity on a display model C64 at Kmart in the 80s.
PEEK and POKE days. big_smile

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United Kingdom

Open Office

You need a Ph.D to use it properly, therefore I have an honorary doctorate in OOlogy

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shitposting

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Brunswick, GA USA

See this conversation: https://twitter.com/chunter16/status/727948970643886081
and these:

https://twitter.com/chunter16/status/727949221719113729
https://twitter.com/chunter16/status/727949604692631552
https://twitter.com/chunter16/status/727949955328020482

Sorry about the DRY principle in action.

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Tacoma, WA

I should preface my enumeration with an advisory that I do computer security for a living.

Languages (In no apparent order):
C
C++
Ruby
Perl
PHP
Python
Java
Javascript
SQL
Assembly (x86 and x64)
Scala
MongoDB
HTML
and others...

Skillsets:
Linux
Exploitation Development
Penetration Testing
Reverse Engineering
Digital Forensics
Intrusion Detection and Prevention
Machine Learning

In terms of music, I have dabbled with most available trackers and software but generally stick with LSDJ, Renoise, and Sunvox.

Last edited by Vellain (May 10, 2016 1:49 am)

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Medina, Ohio
Vellain wrote:

Penetration Testing.

That sounds like something I can get behind wink

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Sweden
Vellain wrote:

I should preface my enumeration with an advisory that I do computer security for a living.

Languages (In no apparent order):
[holy crap load of languages]

Skillsets:
[awesome stuff]

You are basically what I want to be, aren't you? LOL big_smile

Great set of coding skills there! wink

Edit: currently learning a little bit of assembly. Hope I can understand enough of that for it to be useful.
Aaaalso actually researching pen-testing and stuff like that. Not that I necessarily want to make a living as a computer security guy, as I'd definitely suck at it, mostly just because I've always had a sweet-tooth for how that stuff works.

Last edited by my.Explosion (May 10, 2016 7:07 am)

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Tacoma, WA
my.Explosion wrote:
Vellain wrote:

I should preface my enumeration with an advisory that I do computer security for a living.

Languages (In no apparent order):
[holy crap load of languages]

Skillsets:
[awesome stuff]

You are basically what I want to be, aren't you? LOL big_smile

Great set of coding skills there! wink

Edit: currently learning a little bit of assembly. Hope I can understand enough of that for it to be useful.
Aaaalso actually researching pen-testing and stuff like that. Not that I necessarily want to make a living as a computer security guy, as I'd definitely suck at it, mostly just because I've always had a sweet-tooth for how that stuff works.

Hahaha, if you want to get really good, you should play CTF (Capture the Flag) competitions. They are kinda of like jeopardy style competitions where the difficulty of the challenge corresponds to the number of points you receive for it. The challenges will be across a wide variety of areas, but almost always include exploitation and reverse engineering. A good beginner continuous (no end) CTF is http://overthewire.org/wargames/. Other than that, read a lot of http://reddit.com/r/netsec. Netsec always has good writeups on real vulnerabilities and exploits. Stuff like assembly take a long time to get good with and practice makes perfect. I know some guys who do malware analysis and they can take apart polymorphic code like a first grade reading assignment only because they look at it all day everyday.

Last edited by Vellain (May 11, 2016 1:05 am)

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Sweden
Vellain wrote:

Hahaha, if you want to get really good, you should play CTF (Capture the Flag) competitions. They are kinda of like jeopardy style competitions where the difficulty of the challenge corresponds to the number of points you receive for it. The challenges will be across a wide variety of areas, but almost always include exploitation and reverse engineering. A good beginner continuous (no end) CTF is http://overthewire.org/wargames/. Other than that, read a lot of http://reddit.com/r/netsec. Netsec always has good writeups on real vulnerabilities and exploits. Stuff like assembly take a long time to get good with and practice makes perfect. I know some guys who do malware analysis and they can take apart polymorphic code like a first grade reading assignment only because they look at it all day everyday.

holy crap! Thanks! big_smile I'll definitely check this out. Too cool! smile

And yes, assembly is tough. My original plan was to learn enough to make it not completely muddy when looking at disassembly which in itself also is very tough, but I gotta start somewhere. It's all very new right now but I get to work this mush in my skull again for the first time in what feels like years LOL.

Also, sidenote, I'm hoping that a better understanding as to what happens "closer the metal" will improve my optimization skills in C++ as well. smile

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UK

-Develop software for windows, linux, os x, ios and android.
-Develop for various PIC, AVR and others.
-A bit of web development
-Built a couple of robots
-Bit of hardware programing with RPI
-Built some stuff using unity

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(ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧ el ass dee j

HTML5
Javascript
Slowly dying
Mac/Win

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somewhere out there

-Assembly language
-SID/POKEY/2A03 soundchip programming
-Demoscene programming
-Lurking various forums
-Homebrew Games
-Mac/Android development
-C++/HTML/Java
-Raspberry Pi/Arduino stuff

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UK

Started out on c64 with assembly and basic demo coding. Moved to Amiga and onto 68000 assembly  where I was one of the first coders for Magnetic Fields demo group and later Digital.
Then started making mods and other chip stuff (Future Composer and Soundmon) so stopped coding as a hobby and let the coding to the other guys.

Work wise I'm a DBA nowadays having been a coder for a number of years before that.

Visual Basic
RPG400
Perl
HMTL, JavaScript etc
SQL

I could probably still code 6502 weirdly but I'd struggle doing 68000

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Dallas, Texas

Closest thing I get to real coding is prolly MML for ppMCK.

But very savvy with technical softwares such as DAWs and Photoshop.

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I know C, python,  and a little bit of html5, I've been making quick dirty hacks to my computers since I was little, I can do okay pixel art, and really crude ASCII art, and I can track chiptunes and stuff... but I can't wrap my mind around object-oriented languages, and I haven't done much programming in a year or two. I'm an okay composer, but things get muddy, and I always pretend that I'm composing for Super-Nintendo...