Hi Guys,

I've recently got into chipmusic and have been REALLY busy on my DMG (https://soundcloud.com/roballison)

I'm ready to put my first album together. So far I've been recording straight into Logic Pro X through the prosound jack and then simply adding a few subtle tweaks (EQ - compressor etc) and layering over a kick drum.

What do you guys do? I've heard that some people record each channel separately, what's the advantages of that?

Any tips would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks,

Rob.

Currently I do pretty much the same thing as you do. Prosound straight into audacity, then remove any noise that's left and compress. Probably better ways than this, but I don't really know how to use any DAWs... lol

-doube post-

Last edited by powersupply (Jul 14, 2015 1:37 pm)

recording the channels separately comes in handy if you want to add effects to the individual instruments. It will however increase the noise, mess with your track timing, and possibly create phase issues. Id recommend:

Recording the best possible stereo track, Sound design in the gameboy helps alot.
Multi track stuff you want to put effects on, but minimize this if you can to avoid noise problems.
When not using the solo'd channel, mute it, maybe just use it with the stereo track mixed 100% wet to reinforce your dmg sounds.

I dont really run any noise reduction, but ill do vol automation on the silent parts where you can hear noise. Another fun thing to do is sequence additional low end version of your gameboy sounds and mix them low in the mix to make it really pop on big systems.

generally you'll want to multitrack if you're looking to get a modern sounding mix out of LSDJ

I disagree, you can mix just fine on a good song on the stereo recording.

herr_prof wrote:

I disagree, you can mix just fine on a good song on the stereo recording.

Not saying you can't make a good mix out of lsdj, just not as modern of a mix (aka complex stereo field, surgical parameter automation, submix processing, effects, track eq, etc.)

plenty of awesome recordings have been made over the years without any of that stuff, but avoiding them definitely gives a certain vintage quality, which isn't necessarily bad or displeasing and definitely more "gameboy".

yeah most of your balancing and general "mixing" stuff should already be done in the tracker, tbh. i never catch myself thinking "wow that wav instrument would sound great if i scooped the mids and gated it for 1ms right.... here!"

Last edited by Victory Road (Jul 15, 2015 12:44 am)

The vast majority of mixing problems stem from poor arrangement, not lack of EQ. Keep your instruments spacious and you won't have problems.

Last edited by Dire Hit (Jul 15, 2015 2:55 am)

Fudgers wrote:

generally you'll want to multitrack if you're looking to get a modern sounding mix out of LSDJ

herr_prof wrote:

I disagree, you can mix just fine on a good song on the stereo recording.

modern =/= good

Hmm. I had always thought the purpose of recording each channel separately was for clarity and to give more control when using compression.
I notice a huge difference when physically mixing audio between multiple gameboys vs. recording them separately.
Edit: ^ that could just be my mixer mudding it down though.

Last edited by ShintarouMusic (Jul 15, 2015 4:55 am)

There isnt much more you can compress a sound that has 4bit volume big_smile

In Logic, I just record a single track for LSDJ output, then apply:

1) EQ - a little boost around 50hz and 2500hz
2) Direction Mixer - set to 75% to soften the L R panning
3) Stereo Spread - to create more complex stereo field
4) Reverb aux send

herr_prof wrote:

There isnt much more you can compress a sound that has 4bit volume big_smile

Agreed, though I use a multi-band compressor to bring up the low end a little more when mastering. Of course, I haven't been at this very long so I would defer to the experts smile

Yea good multiband comps and eqs can be quite helpful, and you wont quadruple the gameboy noise floor too!

Compression affects dynamics. Even in four bits, you have access to the entire dynamic range from silence to full blast, you just have less precision. Compression will work just as well on the output of a DMG if care was taken in composing with some dynamics in the instruments. If everything is always playing as loud as it can go all the time, even in 24 bits, a compressor has nothing to work on.

Izotope are currently doing a series of interesting mixing articles on their blog:
https://www.izotope.com/en/community/bl … e+6+Bump#2