i am wondering what people want to know about FM synthesis, i was programming FM sounds since early 90s and i am understanding it since then. on adlib/soundblaster was primitive FM synthesis. operators are just sine waveforms with many parameters, and if i remember correctly, only a few algorithms on a DX7 are not serial. yamaha's greatest FM synth with formant synthesis is FS1r, i want it smile and 10 years ago i owned DX200 desktop FM synth which offers realtime envelopes, filter, and switching between algorithms during play was also interesting. today most VA synths offer simplest FM synthesis, one waveform modulate second, nothing extra.

very good idea Lazerbeat!

+1 on the (snare) drum issue

...would also be good to spread some knowledge on pads/sounds moving between lush and harsh

Last edited by the mist toggles (March 15, 2012 9:33 am)

the mist toggles wrote:

...would also be good to spread some knowledge on pads/sounds moving between lush and harsh

more you modulate, more harsh sounds, + feedback makes more metallic smile

i'd love to see ways to make sounds that don't sound "fm", if that makes sense.

I disagree I want tutes on making only lately bass and stevie wonder electric piano sounds.

herr_prof wrote:

I disagree I want tutes on making only lately bass and stevie wonder electric piano sounds.

I have a tutorial on shutting the up and sucking my fat one if you want to see it?

Hm, I'd love a general overview of how to get a sound from my brain into an FM synth. Especially rules of thumb for how to choose modulation arrays when I want to get a specific sound.
Something on how to reverse engineer FM sounds would be cool as well.

Ok, I am officially inspired by everyone's responses to this! I am going to start working on videos. Once I get a good screencasting / voice recording set up I will start churning them out.

YEah basic FM synthesis, how operators work etc., would be great. I am just to used to regular oscillators, filters and ADSR. My FM experiments are just fucking around with settings with no real idea of what I am doing.

Last edited by akira^8GB (March 15, 2012 1:33 pm)

Lazerbeat wrote:
herr_prof wrote:

I disagree I want tutes on making only lately bass and stevie wonder electric piano sounds.

I have a tutorial on shutting the up and sucking my fat one if you want to see it?

Im not into micromusic.

µB wrote:

Something on how to reverse engineer FM sounds would be cool as well.

this

To you mean reverse engineering by ear or by ear or when you have the settings for the algorithms and stuff?

akira^8GB wrote:

My FM experiments are just fucking around with settings with no real idea of what I am doing.

I'm pretty sure that's how you're supposed to use FM smile

Last edited by danimal cannon (March 15, 2012 4:10 pm)

Lazerbeat wrote:

To you mean reverse engineering by ear or by ear or when you have the settings for the algorithms and stuff?

Ear and waveform I guess. For example, I have a sound and would like to know if it's more likely to be op->op->op->op or (op->op)+(op->op). On which modulator would be which envelope to cause a certain effect. And so on.

nickmaynard wrote:

i'd love to see ways to make sounds that don't sound "fm", if that makes sense.

this isn't likely with typical fm (or phase modulation) synthesis. the way the sideband amplitudes spread out with respect to the modulation index (bessel functions) doesn't lend itself to anything other than those archetypal fm textures.

one approach is to use modfm to produce bandlimited waveforms ie. square, saw, triangle etc. i've implemented this in supercollider and can send anyone if they should be interested. it's pretty simple but kind of fun. additionally, there are implementations out there in csound by the guy who created it.

i'm sure there're are probably other variants on distortion synthesis using fm to make bandlimited waveforms out there too.

herr_prof wrote:
Lazerbeat wrote:

I have a tutorial on shutting the up and sucking my fat one if you want to see it?

Im not into micromusic.

ohhhhhh snap