cTrix wrote:
herr_prof wrote:

whats the flash cart like world look like for the lynx?

Flat red mini FPGA board.  A bit like a gameboy cart - no casing at the mo.  USB interface to COM converter as per usual.

@Sage: How does the program talk to the linx though the COM port?  Is this via a modded link cable?

its a cable which uses a MAX232 to convert a RS232 to the comlynx voltage level.
On the lynx side you need a cartridge, which contains a comlynx loader. that could be:
BLL loader cart, SIMIS, Championship rally, Alpine Games, Lynx Reloaded, (...)
Karris Flashcart, Bernds Flashcart

Karris flashcart comes with a max232 on the cartridge, for the others you need to built the cable on your own. i do not think anyone sells them anymore. The componetns cost only a few €, but soldering things together is boring and cost time.

cTrix wrote:

Hi Sage.  I've been playing with Chipper for about an hour making all kinds of sounds and its great fun.  All I've got to say to the others is HARDEN UP!  Because this isn't an LSDJ or a baseline tracker I think it'll lead to some different sounding tunes.   Once you get used to this tool it becomes usable - just like a DX7.  This is a great program - in beta of course - and I'm very much looking forward to playing with it when I have more time :-)   It has inspired me to head off and get a Lynx and the associated dev cart.  I'm happy to work with you as a tester once I've got my Atari2600 tool out (and don't have to worry about trying to finish it). 

I'm interested in the compiling / exporting process to move the tune to the real hardware.  I haven't even started looking at this yet but it's sure to be an adventure!

Thank you.
Actually, the tools was never meant as a tracker, but more like a converter for MOD files and a sound effect editor.

The soudn effects can be used in a program very easily, as they are more or less register dumps... therefore bit larger.

For the full song exporter, basically its working, but there a a few quirks. thus i will only give out the code to people which are _really_ interested in testing it :-)

Sage : I've set up a dedicated page for the project on the forums.  I'll update it with your direction.  It sounds like the same thing I'm making for the Atari 2600 (which converts from IT files) except for Lynx.  Happy to test once I get a unit (or emulate until then) :-)

Guys, I'm new here, but I'd really, really, really like (you have no idea) just simple, raw datasheet style data on the capabilities and control voltages or specific signal frequencies and voltage amplitudes of the ins and outs of this thing ... I am not using cartridges or computers to make analog music with an Atari, that completely and totally defeats the purpose of creating ... um ... Analog music with an Atari ... now it's digital music made with a computer, even though that computer utilized an Atari chip as an i/o and processing device. </rant> so ... anyone got them pin outs/ins?

Sole Technician wrote:

Guys, I'm new here, but I'd really, really, really like (you have no idea) just simple, raw datasheet style data on the capabilities and control voltages or specific signal frequencies and voltage amplitudes of the ins and outs of this thing ... I am not using cartridges or computers to make analog music with an Atari, that completely and totally defeats the purpose of creating ... um ... Analog music with an Atari ... now it's digital music made with a computer, even though that computer utilized an Atari chip as an i/o and processing device. </rant> so ... anyone got them pin outs/ins?

In other words, what are the things you guys are feeding this chip actually giving this chip in terms of voltage and on what pins

you can find the full TIA schematics there: https://atariage.com/2600/archives/sche … index.html

Sole Technician wrote:

In other words, what are the things you guys are feeding this chip actually giving this chip in terms of voltage and on what pins

http://atarihq.com/danb/tia.shtml

0 or 5 volts on the address, data, chip select, or read/write pins.

The TIA is a digital chip, to get it to output audio you have to write data to the address of one of 6 audio control registers.

The bAtari Basic (basic compiler for 2600) manual has an overview of them and how they control sound output: http://www.randomterrain.com/atari-2600 … html#sound

Last edited by RatShack (Aug 10, 2016 5:07 pm)

Sole Technician wrote:

Guys, I'm new here, but I'd really, really, really like (you have no idea) just simple, raw datasheet style data on the capabilities and control voltages or specific signal frequencies and voltage amplitudes of the ins and outs of this thing ... I am not using cartridges or computers to make analog music with an Atari, that completely and totally defeats the purpose of creating ... um ... Analog music with an Atari ... now it's digital music made with a computer, even though that computer utilized an Atari chip as an i/o and processing device. </rant> so ... anyone got them pin outs/ins?

I'm very impressed that you were able to "necropost" as a new member!  I've been here for over a year, and I don't think I can even necropost a post older than 3 months. hmm

In terms of Atari 2600 TIA sound chip, well, there is a tracker available now. It just came out recently. It's still early in production, but already can do some cool stuff. Find it here: http://www.pouet.net/prod.php?which=67648

This is in case you want to test your sounds out before applying them in real life. You know, for conceptual sound testing. You can make full on songs.